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Middle East
Better life eludes African migrants in Yemen
Sharp rise in arrivals seen even though many find they are no better off in impoverished nation than they were at home.
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2012 17:07

Thousands of African migrants have arrived in Yemen this year, drawn by the promise of a better future. But many find they are no better off now than they were at home.

The UN says there has been a 30 per cent rise in refugees landing in the impoverished Arabian Peninsula country from Ethiopia and Somalia.

However, those who make it to Yemen find themselves competing for aid, help and jobs with those who arrived years ago and have been affected by the economic collapse here.

They say there are no jobs for them. Yet, as Al Jazeera's Jane Ferguson reports from the Yemeni capital, Sanaa, they still come, some hoping to make it to Saudi Arabia or even relocation to Europe.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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