[QODLink]
Middle East
Turks held over Syrian defector's extradition
Intelligence agents among those accused of forcibly handing Hussein Harmoush over to Syrian authorities.
Last Modified: 10 Feb 2012 19:40
Turkey has arrested five people over the forced extradition of a defected Syrian army officer.

Authorities announced on Friday that those arrested included Turkish intelligence agents, held "on charges of deprivation of liberty and political spying".

The chief prosecutor in the city of Adana said an investigation had been launched into the forcible return into Syria of Lt Col Hussein Harmoush and another Syrian from the district of Hatay province where they were taking shelter.

Harmoush disappeared from a Turkish refugee camp in August. He had by then become an outspoken leader of the Free Syria Army, a name used by armed resistance groups in neighbouring Syria.

His family claimed that he had been handed over to Syria, but Turkish authorities denied the allegations.

Rights groups reported that he was executed in Syria in January.

Al Jazeera's Anita McNaught said this claim had been questioned.

"His family doesn't believe he's been executed," she said. "But what's certain is that he ended up in Syria against his will."

In September, Harmoush appeared on Syrian state television in what the opposition said was a forced confession, saying "armed gangs" were killing civilians.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Lack of child protection laws means abandoned and orphaned kids rely heavily on the care of strangers.
Featured
Booming global trade in 50-million-year-old amber stones is lucrative, controversial, and extremely dangerous.
Legendary Native-American High Bird was trained in ancient warrior traditions, which he employed in World War II.
Hounded opposition figure says he's hoping for the best at sodomy appeal but prepared to return to prison.
Fears of rising Islamophobia and racial profiling after two soldiers killed in separate incidents.
Group's culture of summary justice is back in Northern Ireland's spotlight after new sexual assault accusations.