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Middle East
Egyptian officers' torture trial adjourned
Trail of Alexandria policemen accused of beating a man to death has been adjourned.
Last Modified: 21 May 2011 22:09

The trial of two Egyptian police officers for their involvement in the death of Khaled Mohammed Said has been adjourned till June 30.

The 28 year-old’s death while in police custody continues to draw widespread public protest in the country, but particularly so in Said’s hometown of Alexandria where security forces previously enjoyed unchecked liberties.

The officers are accused of harshly treating, beating and torturing the man but not with causing his death. They say he choked on drugs he tried to swallow.

Eyewitnesses, however, claim he was beaten to death. The incident is seen as one of the sparks that lit the flames of Egypt's revolution.

Leyla Qasim, Khaled’s mother says: "I will get my justice when Khaled gets his, and when Khaled gets his justice then so will Egypt."

She told Al Jazeera she visits his grave before and after every court appearance to tell her son what has happened – about the changes in the country and the role he played in creating a new Egypt.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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