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French police patrol vineyards for thieves
With 2012 tipped to be a vintage year for champagne, grape prices have gone up, making them vulnerable to theft.
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2012 21:04

You would not normally expect the police to spend their time protecting bunches of fruit. But at the end of this year's harvest in Champagne in northern France - a crucial time for wine producers - that is exactly what is happening.

Wine makers there say 2012 could be a vintage year for champagne and that means the price of grapes has gone up, making them attractive for thieves.

Champagnes use the same three types of grape - Chardonnay, Pinot Noir and Pinot Meunier - destined to go into making a product that's always in demand.

This year, wet weather has caused vineyards to produce fewer grapes, pushing up their price to around $8 per kg.

Police have been patrolling the vines around the clock - on horseback by day, and using 4WD vehicles and infrared goggles at night.

Nobody has been prosecuted, but the thefts have stopped.

Al Jazeera's Nadim Baba reports from a vineyard near Epernay.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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