[QODLink]
Europe
Turks vote amid unprecedented prosperity
Many voters in Sunday's poll will look no further than surging economy when casting their vote.
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2011 16:56



For many voting in Turkey's parliamentary elections on Sunday, the country's economic achievements over the past decade will be in the forefront of their minds.

Turkey has seen its gross domestic product more than treble - from $232bn to $797bn - since Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the incumbent prime minister, took office in 2002.

That has fuelled a surge in GDP per capita, from just $3,500 per annum to more than $10,000.

Foreign investment in the Turkish economy has also rocketed, from $1.1bn to $9bn.

In a country where many remember life on the breadline, it is Erdogan's success in providing so many of his country's citizens with the necessities of life that will earn him their votes.

"In the past we used to queue for gas, tea, sugar. Today you can buy as much as you want," said Nizam, a barber in Istanbul.

Now Erdogan has grander plans for the city.

A tunnel is already being dug under the Bosphorus, and plans have been announced to build a multibillion-dollar shipping lane bypassing the city that would dwarf the Suez Canal.

Al Jazeera's Muhammad Vall reports from Istanbul.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.