[QODLink]
Europe
Turks vote amid unprecedented prosperity
Many voters in Sunday's poll will look no further than surging economy when casting their vote.
Last Modified: 09 Jun 2011 16:56



For many voting in Turkey's parliamentary elections on Sunday, the country's economic achievements over the past decade will be in the forefront of their minds.

Turkey has seen its gross domestic product more than treble - from $232bn to $797bn - since Recep Tayyip Erdogan, the incumbent prime minister, took office in 2002.

That has fuelled a surge in GDP per capita, from just $3,500 per annum to more than $10,000.

Foreign investment in the Turkish economy has also rocketed, from $1.1bn to $9bn.

In a country where many remember life on the breadline, it is Erdogan's success in providing so many of his country's citizens with the necessities of life that will earn him their votes.

"In the past we used to queue for gas, tea, sugar. Today you can buy as much as you want," said Nizam, a barber in Istanbul.

Now Erdogan has grander plans for the city.

A tunnel is already being dug under the Bosphorus, and plans have been announced to build a multibillion-dollar shipping lane bypassing the city that would dwarf the Suez Canal.

Al Jazeera's Muhammad Vall reports from Istanbul.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.