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Tokyo struggles with heavy snowfall

Commuters deal with transit delays after eastern Japan's heaviest snowstorm since 2006.
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2013 22:50

Heavy snow that blanketed eastern Japan over the holiday weekend left one man dead and 900 others injured, as Tokyo commuters took to the slippery streets on Tuesday.

A low-pressure system, dubbed a "bomb cyclone" by local press, dumped 8cm of snow in nine hours, the heaviest snowfall in the region since January 2006, the Japan Meteorological Agency said. It left 13cm of snow in neighbouring Yokohama, while mountainous areas around Tokyo saw up to 30cm.

A 71-year-old man in Shiojiri city, Nagano prefecture, died after falling into an open drain as he cleared snow around his house, a fire service spokesman said.

National broadcaster NHK said at least 891 injuries had been recorded in Tokyo and the area around it, many of them elderly people who had slipped on snow-covered streets or motorists involved in accidents.

Major train services resumed operations in Tokyo, although many sections of road remained closed while crews cleared frozen snow. All Nippon Airways and Japan Airlines cancelled a combined total of 37 domestic flights while dozens of other flights experienced delays.

International operations were not severely affected by the snow, the airlines said.

On Monday, Japanese airlines cancelled more than 460 domestic flights, mainly to or from Tokyo's Haneda airport, where runways were temporarily closed as workers removed snow.

Around 3,400 people spent the night at Tokyo's Narita airport on Monday, a spokesman said after train services running to the outlying facility were suspended. They returned to normal on Tuesday.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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