Rice husks provide power in Indian state

Innovative technology burns waste to generate clean electricity to hundreds of homes in power-starved Bihar.

    Despite being the world's fifth largest producer of power, more than 400 million people in India continue to live without electricity.

    In the eastern state of Bihar, where 80 million people lack access to reliable power supply, the husks that coat and protect grains of rice are being used to power up to 400 homes at a time.

    An innovative technology that burns piles of rice husks in a gas chamber converts what would have otherwise been wasted into much-needed energy.

    The electricity produced from the husks is cheaper - sold for $3 per month, less than a quarter of the cost of government connections - and burns cleaner than kerosene.

    Al Jazeera's Prerna Suri reports from Bihar.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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