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Smuggling remains lucrative business in Peru
Nearly 100,000 people contribute to black-market industry, generating revenues of around $1.5bn a year.
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2012 18:24

Smuggling is a major economic activity on the border between Peru and Bolivia, with goods transferred including everything from computers, to clothes, food or fuel

It is estimated that nearly 100,000 people are involved in the illegal cross-border trading, a black-market generating revenues of around $1.5bn a year.

Officials say smuggling generates unemployment because businesses, who pay taxes, cannot match the cost of smuggled goods.

But in one of Peru's poorest regions, Puno, people continue to smuggle their goods even if they risk as much as six years in prison if they are caught.

Al Jazeera's Mariana Sanchez reports from Puno.

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Source:
Al Jazeera
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