War internment remains a bitter US legacy

Presidential order allowed military to hold thousands of Japanese Americans in remote camps.

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    After Japanese warplanes attacked Pearl Harbour in 1941, and the United States entered World War II, thousands of Japanese living in the US were sent to remote internment camps.

    An estimated 120,000 ethnic Japanese, most of them US citizens, were rounded up by the military, leaving behind homes, businesses and land.

    When they were finally freed, many returned home to find that they had lost their properties and livelihoods. The camps remain a controversial chapter in US history.

    Rob Reynolds reports from a former camp in the US state of Wyoming.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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