Canada's indigenous Inuit fear mining boom

Residents of Nunavik worry increasing activity will damage traditional hunting and fishing grounds.

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    Dozens of mining companies are staking claims in Nunavik in northern Canada, an area rich in nickel, uranium and rare earth metals.

    The government of Quebec has also committed $1.6bn towards the building of new infrastructure to help businesses operate there.

    The Nunavik population of 10,000, predominantly indigenous Inuit, stand on the cusp of major change.

    Many Inuit are deeply concerned about the impact these developments will have on their traditional hunting and fishing grounds.

    Al Jazeera's Rob Reynolds reports from Nunavik.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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