US ruling on gays splits opinion

"Don't ask, don't tell" policy allows gay military personnel to serve if sexual orientation is kept secret.

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    A US court has banned the military from stopping openly gay men and women from serving.

    Robert Gates, the US defence secretary, has criticised the ruling that would end the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy. He says an abrupt end to the ban on gay personnel serving openly in the armed forces would have "enormous consequences".

    He also says that the decision should be made by the US congress and that he supports lifting bans once Pentagon prepares a plan to minimise disruptions.

    On the other hand, gay-rights activists have backed the court's decision, saying that the ruling will prompt a more open culture within the US military.

    Speaking to Al Jazeera, Mike Almy, an officer discharged from US air force, shared his views on the judge's ruling.

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera


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