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Libya's first post-Gaddafi vote may face delay
Senior poll official quits, saying June 19 date is "mission impossible", though Election Commission remains confident.
Last Modified: 28 May 2012 12:04

Libya's former deputy election commissioner says he quit his post because he does not believe the country is ready for next month's elections.

Sghair Majeri has told Al Jazeera that "holding elections by June 19 is a mission impossible" as it is a time-consuming process.

"The ratification process of the final list of candidates will end on the 5th or 6th of June," he said.

"Then we need to sign a contract to print the ballot papers abroad and have them distributed across Libya. That would need at least four weeks, which means voting cannot take place before the second week of July."

However, Libya's Election Commission insists everything is still on track for holding the vote on June 19.

Over 2.7 million voters have registered nation-wide. Four-thousand candidates are competing for a seat in the national congress that will be charged with writing a new constitution.

Al Jazeera's Omar Al-Saleh reports from Tripoli.

Source:
Al Jazeera English
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