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Africa
Medical efforts stepped up in Mogadishu
Doctors take advantage of lull in fighting but many in Somali capital still require urgent help.
Last Modified: 29 Aug 2011 17:23

Doctors are taking advantage of a relative lull in fighting in the Somali capital, Mogadishu, despite fears that fighting will increase again over the next few days.

A few weeks ago al-Shabab fighters, who allegedly have links with al-Qaeda, pulled out of Mogadishu, in what they said was a "tactical" move.

Fighting has since been considerably reduced in the capital but bombings and shootings continue. On Sunday, a woman died in a roadside bombing, allegedly targeted at African Union peacekeepers.

However, despite the threat of increased fighting, aid workers are making the most of the relative peace in the city to provide basic medical services to the many displaced people affected by the famine.

This help, however, is still not enough if Mogadishu's homeless people are to survive food shortages and disease.

Al Jazeera's Emike Umolu reports.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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