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Libyan rebel fighter speaks to Al Jazeera
As fighting continues, an opposition fighter says pro-Gaddafi supporters will not be harmed.
Last Modified: 22 Aug 2011 13:10

Nasser, a Libyan opposition fighter in Tajoura, east of Tripoli, says the area is locked down and sporadic gunfire is still ongoing in the area.

He said one person was shot in the head and almost 38 people injured on Sunday. Nasser told Al Jazeera that rebels had encountered mercenaries about two kilometres from Tajoura in an area called al-Haniya.

He also said that there was ongoing shelling from the al-Mansoura area.

"There is a fight between the rebels and Gaddafi forces. The rebels are actually in a weaker position. The [Gaddafi] battalions are using heavier artillery."

Safety for civilians

Nasser said that civilians in the towns had not been injured because roads entering the areas had been blocked off.

"No one can go in or go out . Everyone who has an underground basement, the people, women and children, the wounded, have been staying there."

He said the rebel fighters knew each other by name because they were all neighbours.

"Pro Gaddafi... No one is going to harm them... We want the Libyan National Council to deal with such things. Because we are basically rebels.

"We haven't got any authority to deal with them."

Post revolution

He said that there were mechanisms in place to restore peace in the country and to deal with the excess ammunition and weapons in the country once the battle for Libya ends.

He told Al Jazeera that when the rebels gave out guns, volunteers had to provide their names, national ID numbers and their residential address.

"So this might deal with at least 40-45 per cent of the issues. For the other per cent there are going to be really strict check points..."

"We are going to do every little [inside] security," he said.

Source:
Al Jazeera
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