[QODLink]
Africa
A glimpse into Gaddafi's palace
Libyan leader's al-Baida palace is not just luxurious, but a bunker designed to withstand a nuclear attack.
Last Modified: 27 Feb 2011 18:38 GMT

As pro-democracy demonstrators gain control of more cities in eastern Libya, Muammar Gaddafi's many properties in the hands of protesters have been ransacked and destroyed.

One such palace sits on the outskirts of al-Baida.

Set in beautifully landscaped gardens, with a covered swimming pool, a sauna and a jacuzzi for Gaddafi and his guests, the palace offers a glimpse into the fortified world of a leader, who, according to US diplomatic cables released by WikiLeaks, suffers from a severe phobia.

With a fully equipped underground shelter designed to keep the leader safe for several months, in case of an attack involving use of unconventional weapons, the palace is more than just a luxurious castle.

The bunker in the palace has a fully serviced air filter system and is also equipped with emergency generators, fire alarm, water pumps, and a ladder fixed in what could have served as a back emergency exit to help the leader escape.

Al Jazeera's Jacky Rowland gives us a glimpse into one of Gaddafi's palaces.

Source:
Al Jazeera
Topics in this article
Country
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
Featured
Women's rights activists are demanding change after Hanna Lalango, 16, was gang-raped on a bus and left for dead.
Buried in Sweden's northern forest, Sorsele has welcomed many unaccompanied kids who help stabilise a town exodus.
A look at the changing face of North Korea, three years after the death of 'Dear Leader'.
While some fear a Muslim backlash after café killings, solidarity instead appears to be the order of the day.
Victims spared by the deadly disease are reporting blindness and other unexpected post-Ebola health issues.