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Bomb scare no worry for Nadal

Unruffled by bomb scare, world number one eases into Miami Open quarter-finals with a straight-sets win.

Last updated: 26 Mar 2014 09:38
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Rafael Nadal of Spain took just 62 minutes to beat Italy's Fabio Fognini [AFP]

Unruffled by a bomb scare that locked down the Sony Open, world number one Rafa Nadal brushed past Italy's Fabio Fognini 6-2, 6-2 to join Novak Djokovic, Roger Federer and Andy Murray in the last-eight.

Officials announced a suspicious package had been left near the main entrance to the sprawling tennis facility which was quickly locked down, keeping thousands of spectators from entering or leaving while Miami Dade police investigated.

The all clear was given just before Nadal stepped onto the Crandon Park centre court to face Fognini in the final match of the night.

The Spaniard showed no signs of being alarmed by the bomb scare as he completed the win in 62 minutes.

Nadal's next opponent is Canadian Milos Raonic, who beat Benjamin Becker 6-3, 6-4.

Nadal's great rival Federer was also in cruise control, needing just 49 minutes to dismiss ninth seeded Frenchman Richard Gasquet 6-1, 6-2.

Defending champion Murray, playing his first event since splitting with coach Ivan Lendl last week, has looked increasingly comfortable and confident on his own. He disposed of 11th-seeded Frenchman Jo-Wilfried Tsonga 6-4, 6-1 without facing a single break point.

Djokovic, a three-time winner on the Miami hardcourts, had only two break points the entire match but that was all the second seeded Serb needed, converting both chances on his way to a 6-3, 7-5 win over Spaniard Tommy Robredo.

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Source:
Reuters
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