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Tennis

A disgruntled Berdych through to quarters

Jet-lagged Tomas Berdych complains about the new 25-second rule after defeating Tobias Kamke at Dubai Open.
Last Modified: 27 Feb 2013 16:33
Berdych is passionately against new time limit rule and the power it gives to referees [AFP]

World number six Tomas Berdych on Wednesday overcame jet-lag, an umpire's warning and a difficult first set against tenacious German Tobias Kamke at the Dubai Open before calling for changes to the time limit rule.

Berdych emerged both relieved and frustrated after surviving 7-5, 6-1 against the world number 90, which carried him laboriously into the quarter-finals of the tournament.

"I don't like it. I'm not a fan of it. I don't see any single reason why to have this rule"

Tomas Berdych on 25-sec rule

The Czech contested the Marseille final 4,800 kilometres away on Sunday and struggled in the first set, saving 12 break points, dropping serve twice and three times being within one blow of being taken to a tie-break.

With Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, his Marseille conqueror, having been similarly jaded during a first round loss to Michael Llodra, there was a distinct sense that Berdych was in danger from multiple pressures.

One of them was the new 25-second time rule, which reduces by five seconds the permitted pause between rallies, and which annoyed Berdych when it was imposed on him during his most difficult moments.

"I don't like it. I'm not a fan of it. I don't see any single reason why to have this rule," he said.

"What could be positive on this? What could work? What could be advantage?"

Too much power

The conventional answer is improving the situation for spectators by speeding up the game, which has on average had only 20 minutes in an hour when there is action.

Berdych, though, was sardonic about his transgressions.

"I get like a six or seven (warnings) in Chennai and then I did not get one in Marseille and now I just get only warning. So I'm improving," he said dryly.

"If you have like 25 (seconds) and he has a bad day, or he doesn't like you, it's 24 and you go"

Tomas Berdych

Berdych's criticisms were directed also towards arbitrary impositions of the rule.

"It should be more clear what's going on, because the referee has so much power on you," he claimed.

"He can do whatever he wants. If you have like 25 (seconds) and he has a bad day, or he doesn't like you, it's 24 and you go.

"I mean, it's so simple. Let's put the clock there and then everybody goes by the clock. Simple as that if they want to go straight."

Berdych also found it hard to continue adapting from indoor courts in Europe to the warm sun and wind in the Gulf. He tried to compensate by focusing hard and tried to take pleasure merely in making it to the last eight.

There he will play the winner of Llodra and Dmitry Tursunov, the wild card entry from Russia.

Second round results:

2-Roger Federer (Switzerland) beat Marcel Granollers (Spain) 6-3 6-4
Dmitry Tursunov (Russia) beat Michael Llodra (France) 7-6(5) 2-6 6-3
4-Juan Martin Del Potro (Argentina) beat Somdev Devvarman (India) 6-4 6-4
7-Andreas Seppi (Italy) beat Lukas Rosol (Czech Republic) 6-4 7-6(4)
Nikolay Davydenko (Russia) beat Victor Hanescu (Romania) 6-4 7-6(2)
3-Tomas Berdych (Czech Republic) beat Tobias Kamke (Germany) 7-5 6-1
Daniel Brands (Germany) beat 8-Mikhail Youzhny (Russia) 6-4 6-4

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Source:
AFP
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