Djokovic and Kvitova win top tennis award

Serbia's Novak Djokovic and Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic named ITF World Champions for 2011.

    Twenty-one year-old Kvitova won six titles this season, including her first major at Wimbledon and the season-ender WTA Championships [REUTERS]

    Novak Djokovic capped his incredible season by being named ITF World Champion on Tuesday, becoming the first player other than Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal to win the men's award since 2003.

    The 24-year-old Serb won the Australian Open, Wimbledon and US Open in a stellar year in which he took over as the top-ranked player, finishing with 10 titles and a 70-6 overall record.

    "Starting with victory in last year's Davis Cup final, this has been an almost perfect 12 months for me,'' Djokovic said.

    "I have always dreamed about becoming the best in the world, and to have won three Grand Slam titles and finished the year as No1 is very special.''

    Kvitova breakthrough

    Petra Kvitova won the women's award after winning Wimbledon and leading the Czech Republic to victory in the Fed Cup, ending a breakthrough year as the second-ranked player in the world.

    "I will cherish this award, which is the cherry on top of a wonderful year,'' said the 21-year-old Kvitova, who edged out top-ranked Caroline Wozniacki - last year's champion - in the voting.

    ITF President Francesco Ricci Bitti praised Djokovic and Kvitova for having strong records individually and with their countries.

    "Novak's achievements this year are remarkable in such a strong era for men's tennis, while Petra has made a major breakthrough on the women's tour,'' Bitti said.

    American twins Bob and Mike Bryan were named world champions in men's doubles for the eighth time, while Kveta Peschke of the Czech Republic and Katarina Srebotnik of Slovenia won the award in women's doubles.

    The players will receive their awards at the annual ITF World Champions dinner in Paris on June 5, during the French Open.

    SOURCE: AP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    The woman who cleans up after 'lonely deaths' in Japan

    When somebody dies lonely and alone, Miyu Kojima steps in to clean their home and organise the mementos of their life.

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    Putin and the 'triumph of Christianity' in Russia

    The rise of the Orthodox Church in Russia appears unstoppable, write filmmakers Glen Ellis and Viktoryia Kolchyna who went to investigate the close ties between the church and Putin.

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    The chill effect: Is India's media running scared?

    Much of India's media spurns a scoop about the son of PM Modi's right-hand man. Plus, NFL as platform for race politics.