Safety threat for Sochi opener

Most expensive winter games in history to open with lavish ceremony in Sochi on Russia's Black Sea coast.

    Safety threat for Sochi opener
    Demonstrators release balloons with messages against Russia's President Vladimir Putin and anti-gay laws [Reuters]

    The two-week Sochi Winter Olympic Games are due to start on Friday, overshadowed with concerns of possible attacks, despite the host's efforts to reassure the world that the event is safe.

    Ballet, man-made snow and avant-garde art will mark the opening of the most expensive games in Olympic history which cost about $50bn, 10 times what Canada spent to host the games four years ago, raising doubts of corruption.

    Expected to attend the opening is Russia's President Vladimir Putin, in an additional bid to brush off security warnings made almost daily, in the weeks leading to the event's inauguration.

    The US Transport agency temporarily banned on Thursday liquids and gels in carry-on baggage on flights between Russia and the United States.

    This came a day after the US warned airlines that fighters may target them by placing explosive materials in toothpaste or cosmetic tubes in an attempt to disrupt the Olympic Games in Sochi.

    European officials have also expressed their concern of an attack during the sporting event.

    This follows a December twin bomb blast that killed 34 people in Russia’s Volgograd, and was followed by threats made by a group of rebels from Russia's North Caucasus to attack the Sochi Winter Olympics in a video published online.

    However, US President Barrack Obama said on Thursday that Russia had an "enormous stake" in thwarting violence at the Sochi Olympics, adding that Washington was doing everything it could to help keep athletes safe.

    "I think the Russians have an enormous stake, obviously, in preventing any kind of terrorist act or violence at these venues. They have put a lot of resources into it," Obama said in an interview with US Olympic television host NBC, AFP news agency reported.

    Gay rights

    The Russian government is also overlooking worldwide gay right protests, hoping calls against a recently anti-gay law will not jeopardise the much-needed success of the sport ceremony.

    Gay rights activists across the world held protests in about 20 cities on Wednesday against the Russian government to denounce a law it passed last year outlawing the "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations".

    Gay groups say the law has contributed to the intolerance against the country's homosexual community.
    Russia's deputy prime minister said on Thursday that the organiser will not discriminate against Sochi visitors or athletes because of their sexuality.

    Backing the government's support for the so-called gay propaganda law, Dmitry Kozak said athletes are free to express their views and discuss their sexuality as long as they "leave the kids alone".

    SOURCE: Al Jazeera and agencies


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    More than 300 people died in Somalia but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.