[QODLink]
Olympics

Busy week of bidding in Lausanne

Six presidential candidates and three host cities come together in Switzerland in an effort to charm IOC members.

Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 14:19
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Current IOC President Jacques Rogge steps down in September after 12 years in charge [AP]

With the voting just over two months away, the bidding for the 2020 Olympics and the race for the IOC presidency are reaching a pivotal stage.

Both campaigns come together this week in Lausanne as the three bid cities and six presidential candidates make vital presentations to the voters - the 100-plus members of the International Olympic Committee.

Istanbul, Madrid and Tokyo make their pitches to the IOC assembly on Wednesday, with the Turkish city having the most at stake following the wave of anti-government protests that swept the country. The presidential contenders present their platforms to the members on Thursday.

Both events could prove decisive going into the final weeks before the IOC session in Buenos Aires, Argentina, where the members will vote by secret ballot for the host city on September 7 and the new president on September 10.

The presentations will be made behind closed doors at the Beaulieu convention center. The bid cities will each have 45 minutes to make their case, with another 45 minutes allotted for questions and answers. The presidential candidates will each have 15 minutes to outline their manifestos.

Overseeing the proceedings will be IOC President Jacques Rogge, who steps down in September after 12 years in office. He served an initial eight-year term and was elected to a second four-year mandate.

Vying to succeed Rogge are: IOC vice presidents Thomas Bach of Germany and Ng Ser Miang of Singapore, executive board members Sergei Bubka of Ukraine and C.K. Wu of Taiwan, and former board members Richard Carrion of Puerto Rico and Denis Oswald of Switzerland. 

Election Buzz

The presidential race is generating more buzz than the 2020 contest among the members.

"Basically the most important thing we do is to elect a president," said senior Norwegian IOC member Gerhard Heiberg.

"It's more important than organising cities for the games. We have many challenges coming.

"We will elect a person for eight years. This person will mean a lot of difference in the IOC, the thinking, the strategy. I meet a lot of IOC members and they talk about nothing else.''

We will elect a person for eight years. This person will mean a lot of difference in the IOC, the thinking, the strategy. I meet a lot of IOC members and they talk about nothing else

Gerhard Heiberg, Norwegian IOC member

Bach has been considered a front-runner, but favourites don't always win in the unpredictable world of IOC elections.

All six candidates have already sent their campaign platforms to the members. Now the voters will get a chance to see and hear them in person, the first time such presentations have been organised for an IOC presidential campaign.

The six will speak one after the other. It is not a debate and no questions will be allowed. The IOC says it wants to keep the format to a controlled, civil campaign.

"They have 15 minutes to stand in front of the session, to show their personality and to lay out their programs for the eight years coming,'' 

Heiberg said. "This will give a good indication, especially for members who don't know the six, to finally get to see them performing.''

The candidates' platforms have steered away from revolutionary change and centered on common themes: reaching out to youth, stepping up the fight against doping, reviewing the bidding process for the games, improving the system for selecting sports on the Olympic program, raising the 70-year age limit for IOC members.

"The race really starts this week," Heiberg said.

By contrast, the 2020 bid cities have been campaigning for nearly two years already, but this will be the first time they appear before the IOC assembly. All three are bringing high-ranking delegations to try to earn the members' trust and confidence.

"The ones who don't take this seriously make a big mistake,'' Heiberg said.

Istanbul are bidding for a fifth time, Madrid are back for a third consecutive time and Tokyo is trying for a second time in a row.

660

Source:
AP
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Italy struggles to deal with growing flood of migrants willing to risk their lives to reach the nearest European shores.
Israel's Operation Protective Edge is the third major offensive on the Gaza Strip in six years.
Muslims and Arabs in the US say they face discrimination in many areas of life, 13 years after the 9/11 attacks.
At one UN site alone, approximately four children below the age of five are dying each day.
Featured
A handful of agencies that provide tours to the Democratic People's Republic of Korea say business is growing.
A political power struggle masquerading as religious strife grips Nigeria - with mixed-faith couples paying the price.
The current surge in undocumented child migrants from Central America has galvanized US anti-immigration groups.
Absenteeism among doctors at government hospitals is rife, prompting innovative efforts to ensure they turn up for work.
Marginalised and jobless, desperate young men in Nairobi slums provide fertile ground for al-Shabab.
join our mailing list