[QODLink]
Olympics
Lifetime bans lifted after BOA loss
Sprinter Dwain Chambers and cyclist David Millar now eligible for Olympics after drug offenders' ban is overturned.
Last Modified: 30 Apr 2012 17:05
Chambers, one of the fastest European sprinters in history, has become eligible again for the Olympics [GALLO/GETTY]

Dwain Chambers, the British sprinter, and David Millar, Scottish cyclist, have been cleared to compete in this year's London Olympics after the British Olympic Association's (BOA) lifetime Games ban on drug offenders was overturned by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS) on Monday.

The BOA asked CAS to mediate after the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) ruled the life ban did not comply with its global doping code which provides for a maximum two-year ban for a first offence.

"The CAS Panel has ruled that the BOA bye-law related to the selection of British athletes for the Olympic Games was not in compliance with the World Anti-doping Code," CAS said in a statement on its website.

"Such decision confirms the jurisprudence established last year in the case between the US Olympic Committee and the International Olympic Committee."

The BOA described the decision as a "hollow victory" for WADA.

"The BOA are clearly very disappointed in the outcome," BOA chairman Colin Moynihan said.

"No doubt for athletes, for coaches and administrators and others in international sport who want to see greater progress in the fight against doping, this will be seen as a hollow victory for WADA."

In October 2003, Chambers received a two-year athletics ban and a ban from the Olympics for life for using THG, a banned performance-enhancing substance.

Millar was banned from the Games after police found empty phials of Eprex, a brand of the blood-boosting drug EPO, at his apartment in Paris.

Source:
Agencies
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Muslim volunteers face questioning and threat of arrest, while aid has been disrupted or blocked, charities say.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
ISIL combatants seeking an 'exit strategy' from Mideast conflict need positive reinforcement back home, analysts say.
European nation hit by a wave of Islamophobia as many young fighters join ISIL in Syria and Iraq.

Featured
Lacking cohesive local ground forces to attack in tandem, coalition air strikes will have limited effect, experts say.
Hindu right-wing groups run campaign against what they say is Muslim conspiracy to convert Hindu girls into Islam.
Six months on, outrage and sorrow over the mass schoolgirl abduction has disappeared - except for families in Nigeria.
Muslim caretakers maintain three synagogues in eastern Indian city, which was once home to a thriving Jewish community.
Amid fresh ISIL gains, officials in Anbar province have urged the Iraqi government to request foreign ground troops.