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London 2012
Kiprotich wins marathon gold for Uganda
Stephen Kiprotich becomes Uganda's second ever gold medallist beating Kenyan rivals in the Olympic men's marathon.
Last Modified: 12 Aug 2012 13:08
Kiprotich surged ahead in the later stages of the race to capture the first medal for his country in the London Games in a time of 2 hrs 08 mins and 01 seconds [Reuters]

Uganda's Stephen Kiprotich stunned a strong Kenyan team to win the men's Olympic marathon on Sunday, handing his east African nation only their second ever gold medal.

Kiprotich timed 2hr 08min 01sec on the spectacular course around the streets of central London, with two-time defending world champion Abel Kirui claiming silver in 2:08.27.

Another Kenyan, long-time leader Wilson Kipsang, took bronze in 2:09.37.

It was Uganda's second ever gold medal after John Akii-Bua won the 400m hurdles in the 1972 Games in Munich, with the east African country's only other medal a bronze from 400m runner Davis Kamonga in 1996.

Tactical mistakes

Brazilian Franck De Almeida went through 10km in 30:38 in a race billed as a battle between Kenya and Ethiopia.

But the Ethiopian team's tactics were dealt an early blow with Dino Sefir falling well off the pace, as Kipsang reeled in the Brazilian pace setter.

Kipsang, the 2012 London Marathon winner then built up a lead on the peloton, going through the halfway mark in 1:03.15, 16sec ahead of the chasing pack.

The Kenyan built that lead up to 30sec on the stunning course, designed to take in as many of the British capital's main sights as possible.

By the 23km mark in sweltering conditions, a second Ethiopian, Getu Feleke, was beginning to flag and had fallen off the chasing pack's pace.

 

In front of thousands of spectators packed 10-deep in some places, Kiprotich set off in pursuit of Kipsang, splintering the pack in the hunt for a podium place.

Kirui and Ethiopia's Dubai marathon winner Ayele Abshero followed, and the trio cut Kipsang's lead to just 11sec, and then pulled level at 25km.

Abshero struggled to stay level and dropped 36sec by the 30km stage, Brazilian Marilson Dos Santos overtaking him into fourth.

As the leading trio went through the gilded, covered Leadenhall Market for the final time with 7km to go, the Kenyans upped the pace to shake off Kiprotich.

Japan's Kentaro Nakamoto and the sole American left in the field, Eritrean-born Meb Keflezighi, were in position to challenge for a podium should anyone hit the wall in the final few miles.

But up front, the two Kenyans were caught napping as Kiprotich showed a dramatic change of pace to surge to the front in an audacious ambush at 32km, and was quickly 200m ahead.

Kiprotich, who has moved to the famed Eldoret region of the Kenya's Rift Valley to train with former world 5000m champion Eliud Kipchoge, accelerated away, a brief look back over his shoulder confirming his position at the head of the field.

Going into the final 2km, the 23-year-old Ugandan was 20sec ahead of Kirui, and he had enough time to grab an Ugandan flag on his last time entering the Mall, in the shadow of Buckingham Palace, draping it around his shoulders as he crossed the line for a convincing victory.

500

Source:
AFP
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