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Golf ex-Masters winners meet the guillotine
South African Trevor Immelman made three birdies on the last six holes to narrowly avoid the cut at Augusta National.
Last Modified: 07 Apr 2012 02:06
Nine former winners of the Golf Masters tournament failed to survive [AFP]

South African Trevor Immelman, the Masters winner four years ago, made three birdies on the last six holes to narrowly avoid the cut at Augusta National on Friday but nine former winners of the tournament failed to survive.

Veterans Bernhard Langer, Larry Mize, Sandy Lyle, Ben Crenshaw, Ian Woosnam, Craig Stadler and Tom Watson all failed to make it to the weekend.

"It's disappointing. It's very disappointing because I knew what I had to do and I didn't do it," said the 62-year-old Watson who finished second in the 2009 British Open.

Mize's appearance came 25 years after his Masters win but there was no repeat of 1987 when he chipped in to beat Greg Norman in a playoff.

"I wasn't as comfortable with my game at times as I would like to be on the course, but I always love playing this golf course and coming here," he said.

Canadian Mike Weir, the 2003 winner, and Spaniard Jose Maria Olazabal, who triumphed at Augusta in 1994 and 1999 also failed to progress into round three.

Japan's Ryo Ishikawa, who was given an invitation to the tournament, will not extend his stay after disappointing rounds of 76 and 77.

Another Asian disappointment came in the form of South Korean K.J Choi, who also finished nine over-par.

Reigning British Open champion Darren Clarke of Northern Ireland, was also heading home after shooting 81, with double bogeys on the 13th and 17th holes.

Argentine Angel Cabrera, the 2009 winner, scraped into the weekend by a stroke after struggling to a 78.

The cut was made at 5-over par 149. Just 63 players, from an initial field of 89 professionals and six amateurs, made it.

Source:
Agencies
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