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Formula One

Schumacher showing 'encouraging signs'

Former F1 driver faces long fight to recover, says his agent, despite showing small signs of recovery in the hospital.

Last updated: 12 Mar 2014 11:26
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Michael Schumacher has been in hospital for over two months now [Getty Images]

There are small signs of encouragement in Michael Schumacher's condition but the most successful former Formula One champion of all time faces a long fight to recover after suffering severe head injuries in a skiing accident, his agent said.

"We are and remain confident that Michael will pull through and will wake up," his agent and spokeswoman, Sabine Kehm, said in a written statement.

"There sometimes are small, encouraging signs, but we also know that this is the time to be very patient."

Schumacher, 45, slammed his head on a rock while skiing off-piste in the French Alps resort of Meribel on December 29.

The seven-times world champion has been in a stable but critical condition since then in a hospital in the eastern French city of Grenoble where doctors started lowering his sedation at the end of January to wake him up from an artificial coma.

"It was clear from the start that this will be a long and hard fight.

"Michael has suffered severe injuries. It is very hard to comprehend for all of us that Michael, who had overcome a lot of precarious situations in the past, has been hurt so terribly in such a banal situation."

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Source:
Reuters
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