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Hodgson seeks psychologist

England manager Roy Hodgson wants help for his side as he seeks to avoid penalty heartbreak at Brazil 2014.

Last updated: 25 Feb 2014 10:44
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England have been knocked out of six tournaments since 1990 via penalty shootout [GALLO/GETTY]

England manager Roy Hodgson is considering using a psychologist to help his side avoid more penalty heartbreak at the World Cup in Brazil later this year.

England have suffered a miserable record in penalty shootouts, having been knocked out of six tournaments since 1990 after failing from the spot, including their quarter-final defeat by Italy at the 2012 European Championships, Hodgson's first event in charge of the national team.

"I'm not averse to using a psychologist," the 66-year-old told Sky Sports. 

"We are considering the possibility of inviting someone with us but I think it's very important they're someone who is part of the group. I'm not sure just suddenly shipping someone in to give the players a lecture would work."

Their only success in that period came in a quarter-final win over Spain at Euro 1996, and Hodgson said he was prepared to enlist the help of a professional to help his players prepare, as well as spending time practising on the training pitch.

"I think there's another possibility, we should be encouraging players to know their penalty, to practise that penalty. When you practise penalties within your group the goalkeeper knows the players, so maybe we won't do it with a goal-keeper."

England have been drawn alongside Italy, Uruguay and Costa Rica in Group D in Brazil.

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Source:
Reuters
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