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FIFPro warns players against three nations

International football federation, FIFPro, says professionals should be wary of moves to Cyprus, Greece and Turkey.

Last Modified: 21 Aug 2013 16:09
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FIFPro statement says there are a high number of disputes between players and Turkish clubs [GETTY]

Professional footballers have been warned by the world players' union FIFPro to think twice before signing
to play for clubs in Cyprus, Greece or Turkey.

Players were advised to be especially wary of clubs who were not playing in European competition, with FIFPro saying many of those teams have failed to keep their promises.

"FIFPro wants to caution players and unions about the bad behaviour of clubs in Cyprus, Greece and Turkey," said the Dutch-based organisation in a statement.

In all three countries, the number of disputes increases every year. The only exceptions are those clubs that play in European football: these accept the UEFA club licensing system, which reduces the risks

FIFPro statement

"Cyprus has for years occupied the first position, by a wide margin, as regards the number of disputes submitted to FIFA's dispute resolution chamber (DRC), while Greece and Turkey are vying for second position. 

"In all three countries, the number of disputes increases every year. The only exceptions are those clubs that play in European football: these accept the UEFA club licensing system, which reduces the risks."

FIFPro said players had trouble getting paid and were forced to take out legal proceedings at soccer's world governing body FIFA, which could be drawn-out and expensive.

"Clubs do everything possible to win players over, offering them fabulous wages, a luxurious home, ambitious plans, a bonus for signing a contract, a bonus scheme or a percentage of a future transfer payment," said FIFPro.

"Unfortunately, FIFPro has found that many clubs don't keep these promises."

"Generally, after a few months, the club turns out to be short of financial resources, so the player has to wait months to be paid.

"Very often, he never collects (the wages). Some players find themselves forced to abandon their homes, because the club cannot or will not continue paying the rent and bonuses are never mentioned again."

FIFPro added: "A player who has lost out is left with no other option but to start lengthy legal proceedings via the Dispute Resolution Chamber in order to get what is his by right: his wages.

"Sometimes this turns out to be impossible because the club has meanwhile declared itself bankrupt."

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Source:
Reuters
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