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Wenger: English teams will be back

While Arsenal battle for final Champions League spot, manager Arsene Wenger expects a stronger future for English clubs.

Last Modified: 26 Apr 2013 14:44
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Can it continue? Wenger has kept Arsenal in the Champions League for last 15 seasons [AP]

Arsene Wenger believes English clubs will be challenging strongly again in the Champions League next season after this term's German dominance although his side face an anxious few weeks trying to secure their place.

The north London club have been ever-presents in the Champions League for 15 consecutive seasons, but face a scrap with Chelsea and Tottenham Hotspur to keep that run going.

"What we know is that no matter what state Man United will be in, we will need a great performance to beat them and that's what we want to focus on"

Arsenal boss Arsene Wenger

With champions Manchester United visiting the Emirates on Sunday seeking the first of four wins that would set a Premier League points record, third-placed Arsenal are just one point ahead of Chelsea and two ahead of Tottenham Hotspur, both of whom have played a game less.

With Tottenham at struggling Wigan on Saturday and Chelsea at home to mid-table Swansea on Sunday, the pressure is on. 

Wenger said the fact United had already won the title was unlikely to make his side's task any easier.

"What we know is that no matter what state Man United will be in, we will need a great performance to beat them and that's what we want to focus on," Wenger told reporters on Friday.

"I don't know (if they are motivated by a record points haul). I expect them to come and try and play their game and win the game, like they always do when they come to the Emirates."

"We can only focus on our own performance. We are on a very strong run in the last 10 games and we have a good level of confidence."

'Isolated phenomenon' 

Wenger has been impressed with the feats of Bayern Munich and Borussia Dortmund, whose stunning defeats of Barcelona and Real Madrid respectively this week mean this year's Champions League final is likely to be an all-German affair at Wembley.

No English team even reached the quarter-finals with Arsenal and Manchester United going out in the last 16, Manchester City finishing bottom of their group and reigning European champions Chelsea dropping into the Europa League.

"You cannot go as far as that," Wenger told reporters when asked if we were seeing a German takeover.

"Let's not forget as well that Dortmund could have gone out against Malaga (in the quarter-finals) with normal refereeing. You cannot take one event and go to general conclusions.

"That Bayern is a top team in Europe, we knew that before. Bayern is an isolated phenomenon in Germany. They played in the final last year and in three finals in the last four years.

"That is a little bit special. They are a huge financial power in Germany. For the rest I think it is very open. Next season you will see the English teams again."

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Source:
Reuters
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