[QODLink]
Football

Strachan appointment '40 years in the making'

Former Celtic manager Gordan Strachan is proud to take the reigns as Scotland boss after two years out of the business.
Last Modified: 15 Jan 2013 15:29
A match made in heaven? Strachan has the passion and experience to give Scotland a much needed boost [AP]

Gordon Strachan said his appointment as the new manager of Scotland had been "40 years in the making" after he was given the task of reviving the country's football fortunes on Tuesday.

Strachan, a former Scotland midfielder, had long been the favourite to replace Craig Levein, who was sacked in November after a poor start to a World Cup qualifying campaign left Scotland's hopes of playing at Brazil 2014 in tatters.

"I am very very proud in myself and my family are proud I've become Scotland manager," Strachan, whose appointment was confirmed by the Scottish Football Association at their Hampden Park headquarters in Glasgow, told Sky Sports.

"It's a great day for me to do this and it's been 40 years in the making," said Strachan, whose contract runs until Euro 2016.

"There'll be rough times but I know there'll be good times, too," insisted former Celtic manager Strachan, who won 50 caps and played under Alex Ferguson at both Aberdeen and Manchester United.

Scotland have not featured at the finals of a major tournament since the 1998 World Cup in France and Strachan, who had four successful years as Celtic boss from 2005 to 2009, said he was determined to make fans proud of the national side again.

"Every club you go to there's always challenges but this is the first time the challenges are in front of a nation," he said.

"If you can be successful you can make a nation happy and make a nation proud and that is the priority for me to be able to do that with help from other people."

'Time is right'

Strachan, who has been out of a manager's job since leaving English club Middlesbrough in 2010, said the time was right for him to move into an international role.

"You're always interested as long as someone asks you. But I think that time is right now because I've had that European experience," the 55-year-old said.

"I've had to deal with players and I've also had a couple of years where I can look at national football.

"The time is right for me to be able to take a job like this. I have the experience, I like working with people, I like dealing with people and I like trying to make people better."

"I really want the squad and the staff to give something back to the country and the fans who support us because the fans are probably more famous than the squad now"

Gordon Strachan

He said: "I really want the squad and the staff to give something back to the country and the fans who support us because the fans are probably more famous than the squad now.

"So what we want to try and do is to give back something and make them turn up for a major finals competition."

Strachan's first game in charge of Scotland will be a friendly against Estonia at Pittodrie on February 6, before two World Cup qualifiers in March.

Scotland host Wales at Hampden on March 22 and are away to Serbia four days later.

Despite Scotland having collected just two points in their qualifying campaign so far, Strachan refused to ruled out a top-two spot in the group.

"We're going to use the games to try and win. My philosophy is to win games of football, like Manchester United.

"What I know is that these guys (the Scotland players), for all they might get criticised, are the best at what they do.

"They play for Scotland and we have to find a system that suits these players to win games of football."

637

Source:
AFP
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
At least 25 tax collectors have been killed since 2012 in Mogadishu, a city awash in weapons and abject poverty.
Tokyo government claims its homeless population has hit a record low, but analysts - and the homeless - beg to differ.
3D printers can cheaply construct homes and could soon be deployed to help victims of catastrophe rebuild their lives.
Featured
Pro-Russia leaders' election in Ukraine's east shows bloody conflict is far from a peaceful resolution.
Critics challenge Canberra's move to refuse visas for West Africans in Ebola-besieged countries.
A key issue for Hispanics is the estimated 11.3 million immigrants in the US without papers who face deportation.
In 1970, only two mosques existed in the country, but now more than 200 offer sanctuary to Japan's Muslims.
Hundreds of the country's reporters eke out a living by finding news - then burying it for a price.