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Football
UEFA considers goal-line technology snub
European football's governing body lukewarm on system even if it is adopted by FIFA, according to general secretary.
Last Modified: 28 Mar 2012 18:16
Frank Lampard's disallowed goal against Germany at the 2010 World Cup prompted a change of heart on the use of goal-line technology for FIFA boss Sepp Blatter, but UEFA's Michel Platini has yet to change his view [GETTY]

UEFA might stick with using extra assistant referees rather than introduce goal-line technology in its Champions League and European Championship matches even if the use of technology is passed into law this year, UEFA general secretary Gianni Infantino said on Wednesday.

Infantino's comments are the broadest hint yet that UEFA will follow the line of its president Michel Platini who is staunchly against the introduction of goal line technology which is likely to be approved by the game's authorities in July.

The law-making International Football Association Board is holding final testing into two technology systems and both could be approved when IFAB meets on July 2.

"If the technology is approved on July 2 we have to see what is approved, how it will work, how complicated or not it will be - and then it will go to our executive committee," Infantino told reporters during the Soccerex business convention.

Platini opposition

Platini has stood steadfastly against technology being introduced, saying he preferred the use of two additional officials in matches behind the goal to aid the referee.

FIFA president Sepp Blatter, who like Platini was once a staunch opponent of any technological aid, changed his mind after England's Frank Lampard had a clearly legitimate goal against Germany ruled out during the World Cup finals in South Africa two years ago.

Blatter had called for a halt to tests earlier that year but said they could go ahead again after the embarrassment of Lampard's ghost goal.

"What we have at the moment is two additional referees, with which we are very happy," Infantino added.

"And if the two additional referees are approved by the IFAB on July 2, then it's likely we will use that. Certainly that system, then we will see about goal line technology."
 
Infantino said using extra officials has an added benefit as they can help the referee rule on more situations than just disputed goals.

"On goal-line technology you can see whether a goal has been scored or not," Infantino said.

"An additional assistant next to the goal can see this, but also some other things."

Goal line technology will not be used at this summer's Euro 2012, but FIFA has said it expects it to be used at the World Cup in Brazil in 2014.

Source:
Reuters
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