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Football
Harry Redknapp cools on England job
Tottenham Hotspur boss is still the favourite for the England coach role but he believes the job would be frustrating.
Last Modified: 12 Mar 2012 13:17
Redknapp has had a miserable run with Spurs but is not keen to leave north London [GALLO/GETTY]

Tottenham Hotspur manager Harry Redknapp has distanced himself from the vacant England manager's post, saying on Monday he is happy at White Hart Lane and hinting that the national job would be too frustrating.

The 65-year-old is favourite to be named as the successor to Fabio Capello after the Italian quit last month with both fans and media trumpeting the Spurs boss as the man to lead England at the Euro 2012 finals.

Redknapp insists he has had no contact from the Football Association (FA) who have installed Stuart Pearce as caretaker until they decide on a full-time replacement.

Meanwhile Tottenham are reported to have offered him an improved contract and a large transfer budget.

"If you don't have a striker, you just don't have one. And you almost never see the players. "

Harry Redknapp

"When you're in a club, you look for a striker and you sign him. When you're a national coach, you have to make do with what you have in your country," Redknapp said in an interview with French sports daily L'Equipe.

"If you don't have a striker, you just don't have one. And you almost never see the players. Two days a month: it's very difficult."

Asked if he would like the England job, he replied: "I'm not sure. I have a very good job at Tottenham and I like it here.

"But I don't know. Wait and see."

Redknapp joined Tottenham from Portsmouth in 2008, and has turned the north London club into serious challengers for a top-four place in the Premier League.

They are currently third despite a three-match losing streak.

Source:
Reuters
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