Gyan: 'Psychologically I'm down'

Ghanaian striker Asamoah Gyan is taking a break from national duty after a disappointing Africa Cup of Nations campaign.

     Gyan (L) missed a 7th minute penalty in the Africa Cup of Nations semi-final against eventual winners Zambia [EPA]

    Missing key penalties for Ghana in successive tournaments has left Asamoah Gyan "psychologically down" and wanting a break from the national team, the striker said on Twitter on Monday.

    Gyan, who missed penalties during the 2010 World Cup quarter-finals and this year's African Nations Cup semi, used
    the social network to explain his decision to suspend his international career but said he would be keen to play in the
    future.

    "Psychologically I'm down. As you can imagine it's been very hard for me mentally to miss important successive penalties for my country," the former Sunderland striker said on his account @asamoah_gyan.

    "And because of this, a break to recoup my thoughts and emotions will aid me to come back bigger and mentally stronger.

    "I would like to ask for prayers and support from Ghanaians to help me come back with renewed strength to continue serving my country"

    Asamoah Gyan 

    "I have never fully recovered from (the) 2010 World Cup and now 2012 Afcon (Nations Cup).

    "I would like to ask for prayers and support from Ghanaians to help me come back with renewed strength to continue serving my country," he Tweeted.

    Gyan hit the crossbar with a last-minute penalty against Uruguay in the World Cup quarter-final in Johannesburg, that had he converted would have meant Ghana becoming the first African country to reach the last four.

    Earlier this month, he had a seventh-minute spot kick saved against Zambia in the semis of the Nations Cup and was taken off in the second half as Ghana surprisingly lost.

    The Ghana FA received a letter last week from Gyan, who plays club football in the United Arab Emirates, stating his
    intention to take a temporary break from the Black Stars.

    The ruling body said this was because of the abuse Gyan had received since playing at the African Nations Cup.

    SOURCE: Reuters


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