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England team unite against racism in football
The England team train wearing anti-racism sweatbands after accusations of racism fly following friendly with Bulgaria.
Last Modified: 05 Sep 2011 14:03
The English FA complained about racist chants following England's 3-0 win at Bulgaria [GALLO/GETTY]

England players donned anti-racism sweatbands in training on Monday as UEFA considered the Football Association's complaint over the abuse they faced in Bulgaria last week.

Racist chants were directed at black England players including Ashley Young by some home fans in Sofia during Friday's 3-0 victory in 2012 European Championship qualifying.

UEFA was set to study the report from its match delegate on Monday before deciding whether to take any action against the Bulgarian Football Federation.

"The racism was really a terrible thing, I am against it absolutely," England coach Fabio Capello said Monday.

"I don't like the racist people. I didn't hear what happened in Bulgaria because I was focused on the game, but we need to fight against racists."

"I don't like the racist people. I didn't hear what happened in Bulgaria because I was focused on the game, but we need to fight against racists"

Fabio Capello

The sweatbands worn by the England players during training at Wembley Stadium ahead of Tuesday's qualifier against Wales carried the message: "Kick Racism Out of Football."

"That is our message of getting it out there and showing we are behind the campaign," England captain John Terry said.

The racial abuse of black players that blighted English football in the 1970s and '80s has largely been eradicated, with an ongoing campaign by the "Kick It Out" group.

But in Bulgaria on Friday, some England supporters were also accused of responding with chants against Romas, who are also known as gypsies.

"There are issues we are still grappling with and anti-Traveller chants is one of them," Kick It Out chairman Herman Ouseley said.

But Capello is equally unhappy to hear national anthems before matches drowned out by opposing fans.

"You need to respect the other countries," Capello said.

"I remember in Cardiff (during the qualifier in March) I didn't like the boos or the shouts against the other country, because for me as a manager and as a player it's a really important moment, because you wear the shirt at your heart at this moment.

"It's a really high moment, a spiritual moment." 

Source:
AP
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