[QODLink]
Cycling

Candidate Cookson fuming at UCI rule change

UCI presidential candidate Brian Cookson says proposal to change election procedure 'smacks of attempted dictatorship.'

Last Modified: 30 Jul 2013 13:17
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
British Cycling President Brian Cookson (pictured) is campaigning to replace Pat McQuaid as UCI boss [Reuters]

With embattled UCI president Pat McQuaid in an intense contest for his job against British challenger Brian Cookson, the cycling body's election rules are set to be changed.

The International Cycling Union said late on Monday it is preparing an amendment to its statutes, which could safeguard McQuaid's nomination for the September election.

Cookson denounced the tactic on Tuesday as 'a clear sign of desperation' by his opponent, who must also give up his International Olympic Committee membership if the presidency is lost.

McQuaid is trying to secure a valid candidacy after his home Irish federation withdrew its support and a nomination from Switzerland, where he lives, is being legally challenged next month.

What sort of organisation attempts to rewrite the rules once an election has actually begun - it smacks of attempted dictatorship

Brian Cookson, UCI president candidate

Malaysian officials now propose changing rules which would allow any two UCI members worldwide, not just home federations, to nominate a candidate - despite the original deadline passing in June.

"The Malaysian Federation and (Asian confederation) state that their aims are to reinforce the independence of future UCI Presidents by ensuring they are able to carry out the role based on serving the global interests of cycling, independently from those of any single nominating national federation,'' the UCI said in a statement.

McQuaid's bid for a third four-year term is being waged against widespread attacks on the UCI and its credibility. Those intensified in fallout from the Lance Armstrong doping affair and continued revelations of an endemic culture of doping while the UCI was led by McQuaid's predecessor and mentor, Hein Verbruggen.

The UCI has pledged to create an independent panel to investigate claims it colluded in protecting Armstrong from scrutiny during his career, and that $125,000 donated by the now-disgraced American rider was paid to cover up suspicious doping tests.

Cookson was nominated by British Cycling, which he has led for 17 years. He promises to restore cycling's reputation and create an independent body running the sport's anti-doping program.

"It is no wonder that many in the cycling family as well as fans and sponsors have lost faith in the UCI to govern ethically when the man at the top of the organisation is prepared to embarrass an entire sport in an attempt to try and cling onto power,'' he said in a statement.

"What sort of organisation attempts to rewrite the rules once an election has actually begun - it smacks of attempted dictatorship,'' said Cookson, a member of the UCI management board since 2009.

With McQuaid needing a legitimate nomination to stand for election, he now has support from Thailand and Morocco, where he is a member of their national cycling bodies, the UCI said.

The amendment can be voted on at the September 27 election meeting in Florence, Italy, and retrospectively apply an August deadline for nominations.

In Florence, a 42-voter electoral college will choose the president by secret ballot.

Cookson's campaign office said his supporter Mike Plant, the United States delegate on the UCI board, also wrote to the governing body protesting the proposed rules change as "unconscionable, unethical, dishonest, unprofessional, manipulative and destructive."

McQuaid's Swiss nomination is set to be judged by a national federation tribunal in Zurich on August 22.

Three members of Swiss Cycling have challenged an endorsement of McQuaid's election bid, arguing it is "tainted on both procedural and substantial grounds."

563

Source:
AP
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.
Public stripping and assault of woman and rival protests thereafter highlight Kenya's gender-relations divide.