India unhappy at Anderson verdict

BCCI secretary writes to the ICC expressing disappointment after England fast-bowler was found not guilty.

    Anderson and Jadeja were both found not guilty [REUTERS]
    Anderson and Jadeja were both found not guilty [REUTERS]

    The Indian cricket board (BCCI) is unhappy with a judicial commissioner's decision to clear England fast-bowler James Anderson of a code of conduct breach and has written to the sport's governing body to express their disappointment.

    Anderson and India's Ravindra Jadeja were involved in a verbal altercation during the first Test at Trent Bridge last month and media reports suggested the heated dispute continued after they left the field.

    Both players were found not guilty after a six-hour video-conference hearing on Friday and, under the rules, only the International Cricket Council (ICC) chief executive can appeal against the commissioner's verdict.

    "What we have done is we've written a letter to the ICC saying we are not happy with the verdict," BCCI Secretary Sanjay Patel told Reuters, denying the game's most powerful board had requested Richardson to appeal.

    "We don't have a right to appeal in this case."

    ICC officials were not immediately available for comment on this issue which could have resulted in a four-Test ban for Anderson, England's second-highest wicket taker, if a guilty verdict had been returned.

    The fourth Test of the five-match series starts at Old Trafford, Manchester on Thursday with the teams tied at 1-1.

    SOURCE: Reuters


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