[QODLink]
Cricket

Anderson 'push' row threatens relations

England paceman James Anderson faces at least two-Test ban that could sour relations between the BCCI and the ECB.

Last updated: 16 Jul 2014 10:46
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Anderson was man of the match in the opening Test [Reuters]

As England paceman Jimmy Anderson faces the prospect of a ban following a complaint from India, relations between the sides are in danger of becoming seriously soured in the wake of the latest contentious issue involving the Asian powerhouse.

The International Cricket Council (ICC) charged England's bowling spearhead under level 3 of the code of conduct for allegedly "abusing and pushing Ravindra Jadeja" during the opening Test of the five-match series in Nottingham last week.

Anderson, adjudged man of the match for his all-round performance, was charged after India team manager Sunil Dev reported the alleged incident that took place immediately after the players left the field for lunch on the second day.

The England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) are backing their senior player, expressing "surprise" at India's complaint for what they dubbed as a "minor incident".

Anderson, who turns 32 this month, faces a ban of at least two test matches if found guilty after a hearing, the date of which has not yet been announced by the ICC.

Incidentally, Anderson was at the receiving end during the 5-0 Ashes drubbing when Australia captain Michael Clarke was caught by a stump microphone telling the bowler to get ready for a 'broken' arm when the paceman was batting.

Both teams moved quickly to bury the hatchet over the incident, ensuring it was soon forgotten and the focus returned to cricket.

231

Source:
Reuters
Email Article
Print Article
Share article
Send Feedback
Topics in this article
People
Country
City
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
'Justice for All' demonstrations swell across the US over the deaths of African Americans in police encounters.
Six former Guantanamo detainees are now free in Uruguay with some hailing the decision to grant them asylum.
Disproportionately high number of Aboriginal people in prison highlights inequality and marginalisation, critics say.
Nearly half of Canadians have suffered inappropriate advances on the job - and the political arena is no exception.
< >