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Test cricket should not fear the night

With the popularity of cricket's longer form waning, India's Rahul Dravid says people should be open minded to change.

Last Modified: 20 Aug 2013 10:51
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Dravid says the traditional values of cricket will not be threatened by modernising the game [AFP]

Former India captain Rahul Dravid wants cricket administrators to approach the introduction of day-night Tests with an open mind to bolster the dwindling popularity of the longer format among spectators.

The idea of floodlit Test cricket, possibly played with a pink, orange or yellow ball, in more spectator-friendly hours has found acceptance in a wide section of the cricketing fraternity in recent years.

I know there have been concerns about the durability of the pink ball, but I have had some experience of it, having played for the MCC, and it seemed to hold up okay

Rahul Dravid, Former India captain

While doubts still remain about its technical viability, the International Cricket Council (ICC) last year approved the idea of day-night Test matches but left it to member boards to decide on the hours of play and the colour of the ball.

Speaking at an event organised by popular website ESPNcricinfo in London on Monday, Dravid highlighted the primacy of Test cricket and suggested ways for bolstering the acceptance of the longer format of the game across the world.

"If it means playing day-night cricket, we must give it a try, keep an open mind," Dravid, the third-highest run-scorer in Test cricket, said.

"The game's traditions aren't under threat if we play Test cricket under lights.

"I know there have been concerns about the durability of the pink ball, but I have had some experience of it, having played for the MCC, and it seemed to hold up okay.

"It could be an issue at places where dew sets in at certain times of the year, but scheduled at the right places at the right times, it could get test cricket what it needs most: some more people in the stands."

Testing times

Dravid, who also scored more than 10,000 runs in the 50-over format, felt Test cricket should not be sacrificed at the altar of the popular shorter formats and should be ready to adapt with changing times.

"Moving with the times does not mean embracing only T20 and trashing Test cricket," Dravid, who retired from international cricket last year, added.

"It means finding a way to retain the best form of the game in a contemporary environment.

"Remember, while it did take long, there's even a roof over Wimbledon Centre Court these days.

"Day-night Tests remain a work in progress but we can start by sorting out the scheduling around Test cricket, to ensure that teams can complete their home and away cycles against each other over a four-year period."

Dravid, 40, also slammed the current trend of holding two-Test series between countries to accommodate T20 matches as "nothingness of a nothing" and backed a successful launch of the world Test championship.

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Source:
Reuters
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