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Mohammad Asif confesses to spot-fixing

Pakistan cricketer admits guilt for the first time and accepts five-year ban after his role in spot-fixing scandal.

Last Modified: 14 Aug 2013 09:54
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Asif was jailed by a London court in November 2011 after being found guilty of corruption [AP]

Disgraced Pakistani fast bowler Mohammad Asif Wednesday apologised for his role in a notorious 2010 spot-fixing scandal, admitting his guilt for the first time and accepting a five-year ban.

The 30-year-old is the last of three players to come out with a confession, after team-mates Salman Butt and Mohammad Aamer admitted their part and presented themselves for rehabilitation.

Asif, pace partner Aamer and then-captain Butt were banned for contriving deliberate no-balls in return for money during the Lord's Test against England in 2010.

A year later an anti-corruption tribunal of the International Cricket Council (ICC) banned Butt for 10 years, with five suspended, Asif for seven years with two suspended and Aamer for five years.

Asif said he accepted the punishment.

"I accept the punishment from the ICC tribunal in 2011," he said at a news conference.

"I apologise for my actions that have brought disrespect to my beloved country, to the millions of fans in Pakistan and in the world."

The trio and their agent Mazhar Majeed were also jailed by an English court over the affair in 2011. The players were released last year.

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Source:
AFP
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