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Clarke ton sets the Australian pace

Skipper drags Australia back into the Ashes series with his 24th Test century on the opening day of the third Test.

Last Modified: 01 Aug 2013 18:51
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Clarke became the first Australian to make three figures this series [AFP]

Centurion Michael Clarke played a true captain's innings as Australia shrugged off another umpiring controversy to produce an Ashes fightback and rack up 303 for three on the first day of the third Test on Thursday.

The unflappable Clarke was 125 not out from 208 balls at the close after notching the tourists' first ton of the series with a flicked single, while Steve Smith was unbeaten on 70 after a day of fluctuating fortunes which ended with Australia on top.

England, who are 2-0 up in the five-match series and will retain the Ashes at the revamped Manchester venue with a win or a draw, were cheered on by a packed crowd and a lone trumpeter but some pizzazz was missing from their play and the atmosphere.

Opener Chris Rogers, 35, fell short of his first Australia century when he was trapped lbw by a fullish ball from spinner Graeme Swann for a Test high 84 in the middle session.

Replays showed Rogers was right to be given out, but Usman Khawaja's dismissal before lunch was the major talking point.

He was adjudged to have been caught behind off Swann for one but reviewed umpire Tony Hill's decision.

Third umpire Kumar Dharmasena sided with his colleague despite replays showing no obvious edge in the latest decision review system (DRS) dispute to afflict the series and Australia.

Shane Watson earlier got away with several loose shots through the slips, over gully and just short of point but was caught at slip by Alastair Cook off paceman Tim Bresnan for 19.

Patient innings

First day scorecard

Australia

S Watson c Cook b Bresnan 19
C Rogers lbw Swann 84
U Khawaja c Prior b Swann 1
M Clarke not out 125
S Smith not out 70
Extras: (4lb) 4
TOTAL: (for three wickets) 303
Overs: 90.
Fall of wickets: 1-76, 2-82, 3-129.
Still to bat: David Warner, Brad Haddin, Peter Siddle, Mitchell Starc,
Ryan Harris, Nathan Lyon.
Bowling: James Anderson 21-4-72-0, Stuart Broad 21-3-80-0, Tim Bresnan
20-5-51-1, Graeme Swann 25-2-82-2, Joe Root 2-0-8-0, Jonathan Trott 1-0-6-0

Clarke and Rogers, obeying the message from on high to knuckle down and build an innings after repeated Australian carelessness with the bat this series, were watchful but pounced on any loose bowling as the pacemen struggled with footholes.

Clarke was impressive in his 24th Test ton if not at his very fluent best having been troubled by spectators above the pavilion sightscreen when taking on Swann, who took two for 82.

Smith survived another minor DRS controversy when England reviewed a not-out lbw decision against Swann and Hawk-Eye said just less than half the ball would have hit leg stump, thus reverting to the umpire's call.

The hosts later wasted their second and last review on Smith when DRS showed he had not edged James Anderson behind. He was then plum in front to Stuart Broad on 24 but Hill said not out.

Australia had lost the toss at Trent Bridge and Lord's, when England batted first both times on their way to victory, and the relief on Clarke's face was visible as the coin landed his way.

The tourists, who risk losing a seventh Test in a row and a third straight Ashes series, brought in David Warner at six after the aggressive left-hander returned from his banishment to the A squad as punishment for punching England's Joe Root in a bar in June.

He replaced the ineffective Phil Hughes, while off-spinner Nathan Lyon came in for left-armer Ashton Agar and paceman Mitchell Starc replaced the injured James Pattinson.

England were unchanged with Kevin Pietersen fit to play.

664

Source:
Reuters
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