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Cricket
Asian players dominate ICC's dream team
The International Cricket Council selects seven Asian players as part of their one-day team of the year.
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2012 17:05
Indian captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni was included for the fifth time in a row [AFP]

Seven Asian players including India captain Mahendra Singh Dhoni and Sri Lanka's wicketkeeper-batsman Kumar Sangakkara were selected in the International Cricket Council's one-day team of the year on Friday.

Dhoni, who was included in the team for a fifth year in succession, was named captain.

India's Virat Kohli and Gautam Gambhir, Sri Lankan fast bowler Lasith Malinga, Pakistan spinner Saeed Ajmal and all rounder Shahid Afridi were also named in the team.

England captain Alastair Cook and paceman Steven Finn, Australian skipper Michael Clarke and South African fast bowler Morne Morkel completed the line-up.

"This team, along with the test team of the year was extremely difficult to decide upon, but we feel the side has strength to bat well down the order while also having a good variety for any type of conditions when it comes to its bowling attack," former West Indies captain Clive Lloyd, the chairman of the ICC Awards selection panel, said.

"With six countries represented and a vast expanse of talent the team would be a challenge to beat for any number of opposition sides."

ICC one-day team of the Year (in batting order): Gautam Gambhir (India), Alastair Cook (England), Kumar Sangakkara (Sri Lanka), Virat Kohli (India), Mahendra Singh Dhoni (India, wicketkeeper/captain), Michael Clarke (Australia), Shahid Afridi (Pakistan), Morne Morkel (South Africa), Steven Finn (England), Lasith Malinga (Sri Lanka), Saeed Ajmal (Pakistan).

12th Man - Shane Watson (Australia)

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Source:
Reuters
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