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Cricket
Kenya cricket coach resigns
National coach Mike Hesson steps down citing security concerns that have affected his family.
Last Modified: 07 May 2012 15:13


Hesson took on the coaching role in July 2011, and during his tenure Kenya played four ODIs, losing three and winning one [GETTY]

Kenya coach Mike Hesson resigned on Monday only ten months into his two-year contract citing security concerns, Cricket Kenya (CK) officials said.

The 37-year-old New Zealander, who took over from West Indian Eldine Baptiste in July 2011, said he was giving up the role "due to a number of security issues" that have affected his family.

"It is a very difficult decision we as a family have had to make but sadly we have been directly and indirectly affected by a number of security related incidents in recent weeks and my family has to come first," said Hesson, a father of two young daughters.

"I want to stress that this has absolutely nothing to do with the issues relating to my role as national coach and is not cricket related in any way. This is purely a decision about the safety of my family and quality of life.

"Whilst arrangements are being made for my wife and children to return to New Zealand as soon as possible, I will remain behind to complete any imminent national team engagements," Hesson added.

He will be in charge when Kenya host Namibia in a four-day ICC Intercontinental Cup qualifier next month, which will also include two one-day internationals and two unofficial Twenty20 matches.

Cricket officials have refused to speculate on Hesson's sudden departure.

The former Otago coach was once shortlisted for the role as manager of the New Zealand Black Caps, whose current coach John Wright of Australia will step down in August.

Source:
AFP
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