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Cricket
Indian board to discuss corruption claim
Cricket board look into claims of spot fixing after a TV channel alleges extensive corruption in Indian Premier League.
Last Modified: 15 May 2012 15:49
Shalabh Srivastava of the Kings XI Punjab is one of five players suspended after allegations [AP]


The Indian cricket board are investigating allegations of spot fixing in domestic games stemming from a sting operation by a TV news channel.

The Board of Control for Cricket in India on Tuesday said they would closely scrutinise the TV footage and would "not tolerate any violation of regulations and any act of corruption."

The TV sting involved reporters posing as agents of a sports management firm offering players money to perform in a certain way at specific times in the match.

"They have video clippings of me in other conversations, but why is it that they don't have a video of me demanding money for spot fixing in IPL? Why is that only an audio clipping"

T.P. Sudhindra

The channel showed T.P. Sudhindra, who plays for Deccan Chargers in the Twenty20 Indian Premier League, allegedly bowling a no-ball in a local T20 game in the central Indian city of Indore for $1,000.

Pictures captured by a hidden camera appeared to show Sudhindra agreeing to bowl a no-ball with his second delivery of the game. Broadcaster India TV then showed clippings of the game in which Sudhindra bowls a no-ball by well over a foot at the pre-determined time.

Though the video does not show Sudhindra agreeing to fix an IPL game, the channel did play out a purported telephone conversation with Shalabh Srivastava of the Kings XI Punjab team agreeing to bowl a no-ball in the IPL.

Srivastava, who did not get to play in the IPL this season, denied the allegations.

"This is a false allegation and I will definitely file a case against them (India TV),'' Srivastava told the NDTV news channel.

"They have video clippings of me in other conversations, but why is it that they don't have a video of me demanding money for spot fixing in IPL? Why is that only an audio clipping?''

Examined thoroughly

The Indian cricket board said it would meet to discuss the issue.

"The complete footage of the 'sting operation,' will be sought, and examined thoroughly,'' the BCCI said in a statement.

"The GC (Governing Council) will meet on an emergent basis to review the footage and take appropriate strict action.''

The India TV also showed some players claiming IPL teams lure players by offering them more money than allowed under tournament rules with undeclared transactions.

Pune Warriors player Mohnish Mishra and Kings XI Punjab's Amit Yadav were shown apparently agreeing to negotiate with other teams in the IPL, which is not allowed under tournament rules.

The allegations come within days of the BCCI announcing plans to set up its own anti-corruption unit.

A similar undercover sting by the British newspaper The News of the World led to prison sentences last year for Pakistan players Salman Butt, Mohammad Asif and Mohammad Amir after they conspired to bowl no-balls at pre-determined times in a Test at England in 2010.

Source:
AP
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