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Cricket
'England need to continue being patient'
Stuart Broad helps England into a strong position in second Test against Pakistan but knows patience will be important.
Last Modified: 27 Jan 2012 17:13
England's Stuart Broad has impressed with bat and ball during the second Test with Pakistan [AFP] 

All-rounder Stuart Broad, who showed with the bat on Friday how quickly runs could be scored, said England will be patient on the fourth day as the tourists try to restrict Pakistan's lead in the second Test in Abu Dhabi.

Pakistan will resume their second innings on 125 for four on Saturday, 55 runs ahead of England who are looking to avenge their 10-wicket defeat in last week's first of three Tests.

The hosts had looked in disarray after slumping to 54 for four, but Asad Shafiq and Azhar Ali put on an unbeaten
partnership of 71.

Broad said England would not be reckless in trying to dismiss the duo.

"In Test cricket you expect partnerships - the important thing was we didn't start chasing wickets, trying magical
deliveries, we just stayed patient," Broad told reporters on Friday.

"With 19 overs to the new ball, we're delighted with our position - the new ball has quite a big effect on this wicket
and it was important we didn't chase wickets when the ball stopped spinning as much.

"Tomorrow, the first hour will be a holding hour. Both teams will try to get into the day, then the new ball will be
massive." 

'Counter punch'

England had slumped from 197-2 to 227-6 in their first innings when Broad came to the crease, but he immediately forced Pakistan onto the back foot racing to 27 from 25 balls as he plundered four boundaries.

Broad kept up that pace to end unbeaten on 58 as England were 327 all out, a vital knock after the likes of Kevin
Pietersen, Ian Bell and Eoin Morgan had again disappointed with the bat.

"Looking at how difficult it (was) to defend against the pressure of the quick-turning ball, especially last night. I
thought my best option would be to try and manoeuvre the field and try to counter punch," Broad said.

"We don't want to be chasing more than 250 because scoreboard pressure plays a huge role and even if the wicket does get a bit flatter that's still a decent score"

Stuart Broad

Pakistan's Ali said his side would be confident if they could set England a target of 150 or more, while Broad thought the tourists could still prosper if made to chase a higher total.

"We don't want to be chasing more than 250 because scoreboard pressure plays a huge role and even if the wicket does get a bit flatter that's still a decent score," said Broad.

"We have to bowl exceptionally well tomorrow, that new ball will be key. Hopefully we can restrict them to about 200 and then chase that down. Even 150, 200 will be tight."

Meanwhile Australia are on the brink of a crushing series sweep after reducing India to 166 for six in their pursuit of 500 runs for an unlikely victory at the close of play on the fourth day of the fourth Test.

The hosts declared at 167-5 shortly after lunch on another sweltering day at the Adelaide Oval and that tally, added to
their 604-7 declared, put them 499 runs ahead of India's first attempt of 272.

Gautam Gambhir, Virender Sehwag, Rahul Dravid, Sachin Tendulkar, VVS Laxman and Virat Kohli all crumbled once again before the Australian attack to leave the tourists 333 runs behind with a full day remaining.

"The job's not done yet," said Australian spinner Nathan Lyon, who took 3-57.

"We've got another four wickets to get and we'll have to turn up tomorrow and be on our game and hopefully get these four wickets."

Source:
Agencies
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