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Cricket
Afghanistan go down to Pakistan A team
First international cricket match takes place in Pakistan in more than two years.
Last Modified: 25 May 2011 19:33
Afghan cricket fans parade the national flag at the Diamond Cricket ground in Islamabad [AFP]

Pakistan A defeated Afghanistan by five wickets in a limited-overs match at a Diamond Cricket Ground surrounded by armed security on Wednesday in the first international match in the country in more than two years.

Afghanistan is the first foreign team to visit Pakistan since March 2009, when gunmen attacked the Sri Lanka team's convoy in Lahore, killing six policemen and a driver and injuring several players and officials.

The only drama the security had to endure on Wednesday was keeping the boundary clear of Afghan supporters, who rushed forward for all of Mohammad Nabi's seven fours and a six in a blazing 72 off 75 balls.

Despite Nabi's show, Afghanistan was dismissed for 152 in 37.3 overs, and Pakistan A reached a winning 154-5 in less than 40 overs.

Tough conditions

The game was played in 39-degree heat, and Afghan captain Nowroz Mangal said afterwards some of his teammates suffered from dehydration.

"Conditions are quite different in Pakistan than what we have in Afghanistan,'' Mangal said.

"We will try our best in our next two matches to provide enough liquids to our players.''

Rawalpindi will host the second match on Friday, and Faisalabad the day/night finale on Sunday. 

Source:
AP
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