Fixing claims to be investigated

Cameroons's football federation confirms in statement that it plans to look into the team's Brazil 2014 matches.

    Cameroon's Alex Song was sent off for a needless elbow in the back of a Croatian opponent [AP]
    Cameroon's Alex Song was sent off for a needless elbow in the back of a Croatian opponent [AP]

    Cameroon are to investigate claims that seven of their players were involved in match-fixing at the World Cup, the country's football federation FECAFOOT said.

    FECAFOOT said it had instructed its ethics committee to probe allegations of what it described as "fraud" in their three games in Brazil, particularly a 4-0 loss to Croatia in Manaus in their second Group A game.

    "Recent allegations of fraud around Cameroon's three 2014 World Cup games, especially Cameroon v Croatia, as well the existence of "seven bad apples (in our national team)" do not reflect the values and principles promoted by our administration," FECAFOOT said in a statement.

    "We wish to inform the general public that, though not yet contacted by FIFA in regards to this affair, our administration has already instructed its Ethics Committee to further investigate these accusations.

    "We are strongly committed to employ all means necessary to resolve this disruptive matter with the shortest delay," FECAFOOT's interim president Joseph Owona said.

    Accurate forecast

    The allegations against Cameroon came from convicted fraudster Wilson Raj Perumal, who had accurately forecast the result and the fact a player would be sent off in a discussion with German magazine Der Spiegel.

    Cameroon midfielder Alex Song was sent off before halftime for a needless elbow in the back of Croatia's Mario Mandzukic near the halfway line, leaving his side to battle with 10 men for the majority of the game.

    The game was also marred by an incident near the end when Benoit Assou-Ekotto attempted to head-butt teammate Benjamin Moukandjo.

    SOURCE: Reuters


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