West Indies eye Test win over NZ

Tourists end day four just 18 runs ahead with two wickets remaining as the West Indies enjoy a good day with the ball.

    Roach was the pick of the bowlers, picking up three wickets for 53 runs [AFP]
    Roach was the pick of the bowlers, picking up three wickets for 53 runs [AFP]

    The West Indies bowlers produced a spirited performance to put a series-levelling victory in sight against New Zealand after four days of the second Test.

    The Black Caps, facing a first-innings deficit of 239, reached 257-8 in their second-innings, leading by 18 with two wickets in hand.

    Kemar Roach toiled manfully on a placid Queen's Park Oval pitch to claim 3-53 while fellow pacer Jerome Taylor took 2-46. Left-arm spinner Sulieman Benn grabbed 2-62 from a marathon 49 overs, and claimed a sensational return catch.

    Kane Williamson top-scored with 52 while BJ Watling provided a defiant, unbeaten 36 in 4 1/2 hours at the crease.

    Wicket-keeper Watling shared a resolute, undefeated ninth-wicket stand of 43 with Mark Craig, 29 not out. The pair helped New Zealand stretch the match into the fifth day and lifted slim hopes of the tourists' preserving their 1-0 lead in the series.

    New Zealand took tea at 181-6 and quickly slumped to 212-8 as Roach struck twice with the second new ball against aggressive tailenders. But the hosts could not quite complete the job as Watling and Craig held out for almost two hours to the close.

    SOURCE: AP


    YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Double standards: 'Why aren't we all with Somalia?'

    Almost 300 people died in Mogadishu but some are asking why there was less news coverage and sympathy on social media.

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    How Moscow lost Riyadh in 1938

    Russian-Saudi relations could be very different today, if Stalin hadn't killed the Soviet ambassador to Saudi Arabia.

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Kobe Steel: A scandal made in Japan

    Japan's third-largest steelmaker has admitted it faked data on parts used in cars, planes and trains.