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Boxing
Chisora loses boxing licence
British heavyweight punished by governing body following David Haye brawl in Munich last month.
Last Modified: 14 Mar 2012 20:18
Chisora controversially slapped Vitali Klitschko before their fight last month in a series of pre-game stunts [GETTY]

Dereck Chisora has had his licence withdrawn "indefinitely" by the British Boxing Board of Control (BBoC) following his controversial behaviour in Germany last month.

Chisora, a 28-year-old Zimbabwe-born Londoner, was involved in several unsavoury incidents both before and after his WBC heavyweight title points defeat by Vitali Klitschko in Munich on February 18.

He slapped Klitschko at the pre-fight weigh-in, spat water in his brother Wladimir's face during the introductions, and then brawled with British rival David Haye at the press conference afterwards.

Chisora spent a night in the custody of German police after the clash with Haye and, following a hearing in Cardiff on Wednesday, promoter Frank Warren said the board had withdrawn his licence to box indefinitely.

"His licence got withdrawn and what will happen now is we'll consider whether to appeal the decision," Warren said.

‘Fit and proper’

Board secretary Robert Smith confirmed the sanction by saying: "The board have decided Dereck Chisora is not a fit and proper person to hold a licence and have withdrawn it with immediate effect."

However, the lack of any precise ban length meant it was unclear whether Chisora had been given a lifetime exclusion from boxing or merely been suspended for six months.

There were also no immediate details of what fine, if any, the BBoC had imposed upon him.

Smith added that while the board cannot punish Haye because he is officially retired, they would take his role in the brawl into account should the former heavyweight champion re-apply for a licence.

Chisora, speaking to The Independent newspaper, said before the hearing that he was anticipating a ban.

"If they ban me, I'm not going to be sulking around the house," he said.

"I'll still be training because I'm a fighter and I love fighting.

"I just hope they realise how sorry I am and that all I really want is for me to be allowed to get back in the ring again and do what I do best, and fight. "

- Dereck Chisora

"I just hope they realise how sorry I am and that all I really want is for me to be allowed to get back in the ring again and do what I do best, and fight.

"Because I know one day I will be the world heavyweight champion and that Britain will be proud of me."

Chisora's mother was rushed to hospital following his dust-up with Haye and her son said: "Her first words to me when I got back and went straight to the hospital were: 'What are you going to do if they take away your licence?'

"There was nothing I could say to her. All I could do was keep quiet.

"Believe me, I'm more afraid of my mother than any opponent in the ring.

She is worried they'll take away my licence to box and where I'll go to from here. She depends on me."

Regret

Chisora added: "When I look back on it all now, I am really embarrassed. There was nothing premeditated.

"When I slapped Vitali, I immediately regretted it. I was thinking to myself: 'What did I do that for?'"

He also insisted his repeated vows to "shoot David Haye" were empty threats.

"I was shouting, 'I am going to shoot you', but I would never do that. I don't have a gun, I've never owned one and never will.

"It was just a stupid remark. Obviously I regret everything I did and said. Looking back, it would have been better had I stayed at home." 

Source:
AFP
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