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Sprinter Gay fails dope test

American 100m record holder pulls out of world championships in Moscow after testing positive to banned substance.

Last Modified: 14 Jul 2013 17:19
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Tyson Gay won the 100m event of the Lausanne Diamond League meeting in Lausanne [Reuters]

American 100-metre record holder Tyson Gay has tested positive for a banned substance and said he will pull out of the world championships next month in
Moscow and a Monaco meet.

Gay would not reveal the substance in a phone conversation from Amsterdam on Sunday, but he said he was notified by the US Anti-Doping Agency late last week that a sample came back positive from a May 16 out-of-competition
test.

He said that he would have his "B" sample tested soon, possibly as early as this week.

"I don't have a sabotage story, I don't have any lies," Gay said, as he fought back sobs.

"I don't have anything to say to make this seem like it was a mistake or it was on USADA's hands, someone playing games.

"I don't have any of those stories. I basically put my trust in someone and I was let down."

Asked who that person was, Gay replied: "I can't really say it. Sometimes a human being naturally, generally trusts somebody. That's what people do."

Plagued by ailments

The 2007 triple world champion was healthy again this season after being constantly plagued by hamstring and groin ailments, along with a surgically repaired hip.

He won the 100 and 200 at the US national championships last month, setting up an anticipated showdown with Usain Bolt at the worlds. But that has been scrubbed.

Gay said that he would also pull out of a meet in Monaco and fly back to the headquarters of USADA in Colorado Springs, Colorado, to be on hand when his "B'' sample is tested.

A few years ago, Gay was part of USADA's program called "My Victory", where athletes pledge to compete clean.

Gay said in his testimonial on the website: "I compete clean because I really believe in fairness, and besides that, my mom would kill me! Just being honest."

He has spoken with his teammates, friends and family, including his mother and daughter.

'Accident'

"They already know it is some type of accident, or some type of - I don't want to use certain words, to make it seem like an accident, because I know exactly what went on, but I can't discuss it right now,'' he said. ``My
career and my name have always been better than medals or records or anything like that.

"I've always wanted a clean name with anything. Unfortunately, I have to break this news, that I have a positive 'A' sample."

USATF chief executive Max Siegel said in a written statement that the positive test result was not the news anyone wanted to hear, at any time, about any athlete.

"We do not know the facts of this case and look to USADA to adjudicate it and handle it appropriately," he said.

Tight-lipped

Gay was tight-lipped on specifics about the case because he said he could not discuss it when asked if what he tested positive for was a steroid.

"I have to go over everything with USADA first," said Gay, who finished fourth at the London Games last summer.

"I will take whatever punishment I get like a man. I do realise and respect what I put in my body and it is my responsibility.

"I'm going to be honest with USADA, about everything, everybody I've been with, every supplement I've ever taken, every company I've ever dealt with,
everything."

560

Source:
AP
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