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Redskins' name change demanded

Half the US Senate urged NFL Commissioner to change the Washington Redskins' name, saying it is a racist slur.

Last updated: 22 May 2014 17:09
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Redskins owner Daniel Snyder has refused to change his team's name, citing tradition [GALLO/GETTY]

Half the US Senate has urged National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell to change the Washington Redskins' name, saying it is a racist slur and the time is ripe to replace it.

In a letter, 49 senators cited the National Basketball Association's quick action recently to ban Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling for life after he was heard on an audio recording making offensive comments about blacks. They said Goodell should formally push to rename the Redskins.

"We urge you and the National Football League to send the same clear message as the NBA did: that racism and bigotry have no place in professional sports,'' read the letter, which did not use the word Redskins.

Redskins owner Daniel Snyder has refused to change his team's name, citing tradition. The franchise has been known as the Redskins since 1933, when it played in Boston.

In a written response, NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said "diversity and inclusion" has long been a focus of the NFL.

"The intent of the team's name has always been to present a strong, positive and respectful image,'' McCarthy said. "The name is not used by the team or the NFL in any other context, though we respect those that view it differently.''

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid and Sen. Maria Cantwell, both Democrats, led the letter-writing effort. All senators on the letter are Democrats.

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Source:
Reuters
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