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Black Caviar retires at her finest

Trainer Peter Moody says unbeaten mare Black Caviar will 'wander off into the sunset' after the perfect career.

Last Modified: 17 Apr 2013 20:19
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After dazzling career Black Caviar parades in front of media as she hangs up her horse-shoes [GALLO/GETTY]

Unbeaten Australian mare Black Caviar will retire with a perfect record after winning 25 consecutive races.

Trainer Peter Moody said on Wednesday that the super sprinter 'has done everything we've asked her to do' when he appeared at a news conference in front of Caulfield race track, where the six-year-old mare will make a farewell, non-racing appearance for track patrons on Saturday.

He said he and the ownership group led by Neil Werrett had discussed Black Caviar's future over the past few days and 'we decided at lunch today' to announce her retirement.

"We feel we've done our job, we feel she's done hers and she deserves a break now,'' Moody said.

"Twenty-five is a great number. She'll wander off into the sunset."

"We thought about Royal Ascot, we thought about Brisbane and we thought about Adelaide, but we believe she has done everything we've asked her to do. She couldn't have possibly done any more"

Black Caviar trainer Peter Moody

Black Caviar, purchased by Moody for $225,000, won $8 million in prize money, including an Australian-record 15 Group One wins, most over distances around 1,200 meters.

She'll now have some time being spelled in a paddock before being bred. Australian bookmakers were suggesting the mare's first foal could be sold for at least $7 million.

"We hope that in three years, Peter Moody will be training a progeny of Black Caviar,'' said Werrett, his voice breaking at times during the retirement announcement.

Black Caviar, ridden by her regular jockey Luke Nolen, won her 25th race last Friday in the T.J. Smith Stakes at Royal Randwick by two lengths. It was the sprinter's third win since coming back in February from an eight-month injury layoff.

Black Caviar narrowly won the Diamond Jubilee Stakes at Royal Ascot, England last June and faced possible retirement after tearing a quadriceps muscle at Ascot.

But laser therapy and exercise enabled her to return to the track for another - and what turned out her final - abbreviated season.

"We got three more runs than we thought we were ever going to have," Moody said.

"We thought she would be retired post-Ascot."

There were suggestions as recently as the weekend that she'd race again at several tracks in Australia or perhaps return to Royal Ascot.

"We thought long and hard about racing on for another season," Moody said

"We thought about Royal Ascot, we thought about Brisbane and we thought about Adelaide, but we believe she has done everything we've asked her to do. She couldn't have possibly done any more."

"Black Caviars don't come along every day," Moody said.

"It's time to call it a day."

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Source:
AFP
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