[QODLink]
Sport
Slovakia remembers an ice hockey genius
After the crash that wiped out Russia's Lokomotiv Yaroslavl ice hockey team, thousands remember a former Slovak captain.
Last Modified: 15 Sep 2011 16:06
Demitra in action during the IIHF World Championship match between Slovakia and Germany [GALLO/GETTY]

Thousands of people attended a memorial service at a Slovak ice hockey arena on Thursday to honour player Pavol Demitra - the former national team captain who died in a plane crash that wiped out an entire Russian hockey club.

President Ivan Gasparovic and a number of major Slovak hockey stars - including Zdeno Chara, Marian Hossa and Marian Gaborik - attended.

The service was held on Thursday in Trencin's arena in western Slovakia, where Demitra began his career in the top Slovak league in 1992.

"In one moment, the family lost a loving father, and the whole country a hockey genius"

Slovakia's IHF President Igor Nemecek

Demitra was among 37 players, coaches and staff of Russia's Lokomotiv Yaroslavl hockey club who died last week when their Yak-42 jet crashed outside Yaroslavl en route to their first game of the season.

"In one moment, the family lost a loving father, and the whole country a hockey genius," said Igor Nemecek, president of the Slovak ice hockey federation.

"Palo (Demitra) was an idol and a role model for our young players," Nemecek said, adding that his national team jersey - number 38 - will be retired.

Three-time All-Star player, Demitra had played for five NHL clubs during his career, including the St. Louis Blues and the Vancouver Canucks. He was planning to retire after one season with the Russian club.

Demitra, who was 36 years old, is survived by his wife Maria, a son and a daughter.

Source:
AP
Topics in this article
People
Country
Organisation
Featured on Al Jazeera
Swathes of the British electorate continue to show discontent with all things European, including immigration.
Astronomers have captured images of primordial galaxies that helped light up the cosmos after the Big Bang.
Critics assail British photographer's portrayal of indigenous people, but he says he's highlighting their plight.
As Western stars re-release 1980s charity hit, many Africans say it's a demeaning relic that can do more harm than good.
Featured
Remnants of deadly demonstrations to be displayed in a new museum, a year after protests pushed president out of power.
No one convicted after 58 people gunned down in cold blood in 2009 in the country's worst political mass killing.
While hosting the World Internet Conference, China tries Tiananmen activist for leaking 'state secrets' to US website.
Once staunchly anti-immigrant, some observers say the conservative US state could lead the way in documenting migrants.
NGOs say women without formal documentation are being imprisoned after giving birth in Malaysia.